Posts Tagged: MLB

The boys of spring arrive in camp

Top prospects and other big-league hopefuls began workouts with the New York Mets in Port St. Lucie, Fla., this month.
Yahoo News photographer Gordon Donovan visited the camp and caught the young men getting into the swing of things as they vied for a chance to move up through the ranks.

Asses in the way

When photographing an event, you wait for that one great moment to capture on the camera. Whether it be a second baseman going airborne in an amazing double play or a player hitting a game winning home run and being mobbed at home plate at teammates. Then it happens and you get a clear shot, suddenly somebody on the field walks right in front of your line of sight destroying that moment.

Ballpark Roadtrip: Forbes Field

Forbes Field was a baseball park in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 1909 to June 28, 1970. It was the third home of the Pittsburgh Pirates and the first home of the Pittsburgh Steelers.The stadium was named after British general John Forbes, who fought in the French and Indian War, and named the city in 1758.

The US $1 million ($26.3 million today) project was initiated by Pittsburgh Pirates’ owner Barney Dreyfuss, with the goal of replacing his franchise’s then-current home, Exposition Park. The stadium was made of concrete and steel (one of the first of its kind) in order to increase its lifespan. The Pirates opened Forbes Field on June 30, 1909 against the Chicago Cubs, and would play the final game that was also against the Cubs on June 28, 1970.

Ballpark Roadtrip: Braves Field

Braves Field was a baseball park in the Northeastern United States, located in Boston, Massachusetts. Today the site is home to Nickerson Field on the campus of Boston University. The stadium was home of the Boston Braves of the National League from 1915–1952, prior to the Braves’ move to Milwaukee in 1953.

Ballpark Roadtrip: PNC Park

PNC Park, which opened in spring 2001, is a classic-style ballpark, an intimate facility that embraces the progressiveness of Pittsburgh while saluting the spirit of early ballpark originals such as Forbes Field, Wrigley Field and Fenway Park. It is the fifth home of the Pittsburgh Pirates since their inception in 1887.

This riverfront facility combines the best features of yesterday’s ballparks – rhythmic archways, steel trusswork and a natural grass playing field – with the latest in fan and player amenities and comfort.

PNC Park is the first ballpark with a two-deck design to be built in the United States since Milwaukee’s County Stadium was completed in 1953. Because of its intimate design, the highest seat is just 88 feet from the field, giving every fan in the park an ideal sight line.

Ballpark Roadtrip: Great American Ball Park

Located on the winding banks of the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, Great American Ball Park serves as the home of the Cincinnati Reds, baseball’s first professional franchise.

Ballpark Roadtrips: RFK Stadium

The stadium was opened in October 1961 as the District of Columbia Stadium (D.C. Stadium for short). The stadium was renamed in January 1969, for U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated in Los Angeles the previous June. The announcement was made by Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall on January 18, in the last days of the Johnson Administration.

As attorney general in the early 1960s, Kennedy’s Justice Department played a role in the racial integration of the Redskins. Along with Udall, Kennedy threatened to revoke the team’s lease at the federally-owned stadium until it promised to sign African American players.

Ballpark Roadtrip: Dodger Stadium

The ballpark’s rich history began with Dodger President Walter O’Malley’s foresight six decades ago. In 1957, O’Malley lobbied for a new stadium to be built for his Brooklyn club, but when a deal could not be reached, the Dodgers made the unprecedented move to California. In September of that year, the city of Los Angeles agreed to give 300 acres of land to the Dodgers in exchange for the deed to Wrigley Field in Los Angeles and their commitment to construct a 50,000-seat stadium. While Dodger Stadium was being built, the Dodgers played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum through 1961, before the true Opening Day- April 10, 1962 – when the Dodgers finally played in their new home before 52,564 fans.